Monthly Archives: August 2016

Easy pivot: From key-value pairs to columns

If there is one thing I pretty much hate doing in T-SQL it’s PIVOT and UNPIVOT. Even though I used it a few times in the last couple of years, it’s an adventure to find out how it works every time. And I know a lot of people struggle with this part of T-SQL, so let’s take a look at a (hopefully) simple example.

 
Key-Value pairs
The idea of using key-value pairs to store data isn’t new, but with the rapid development of cloud solutions like Azure and the hype around NoSQL databases, using key-value pairs to store data got a big boost. Especially developers (in my experience) love using key-value pair to store their data, because it’s easy for them to consume the data in an application. But it gives the database professional an extra challenge because we’re used to retrieve columns with values instead of a record per value. So how can we turn those key-value pairs into rows? Continue reading Easy pivot: From key-value pairs to columns

Running maintenance on Azure SQL databases

To keep your data healthy and topfit, we all know you need to run something called database maintenance on your databases. This prevents things like performance problems or unrecoverable data from happening, and that is sort of the core business of DBA’s. And when we look at how this can be performed on a regular basis, an on-premise instance is a bit easier to maintain than an Azure SQL database. That’s why I want to share our experience with you on that, hoping that it can save you some time when you start implementing this.

 
Platform setup
In order to get a better understanding of why certain choices were made, I want to share a very basic version of the setup of our environment.

Our platform consists of 2 mayor parts: a private cloud part (that we see as “on-premise”), and an Azure part. Those 2 parts combined make our platform, and this platform hosts all of our services, applications, databases, etc. The development approach we use is everything should be designed with cloud-first in mind, but only if it’s the right tool for the job, and with the exclusion of some data.

The databases we use in Azure are all what Microsoft calls “Azure SQL databases”. This means that there are no virtual machines of any kind are running on our Azure-part of the platform, also known as DBaas (Database as a Service). Continue reading Running maintenance on Azure SQL databases