Tag Archives: Transactional replication

Automatically convert contained database to non-contained for replication

In one of my previous posts, I described how to setup replication to an Azure SQL database. This works like a charm, and I still highly recommend using this when you want to migrate data from an on-premise server (or Azure VM) to a Azure SQL db (PaaS).

But in our environment, we use SQL Server 2016 and contained databases for some of our datasets. Unfortunately (but totally understandable), you can’t setup replication from a contained database. So how do you deal with this? For our use-case, I’ve written a script to automatically change the database from contained to non-contained. And because I’m probably not the only one who needs to do this, I’d like to share it with you.
Continue reading Automatically convert contained database to non-contained for replication

Replication: Snapshot Agent fails on date conversion

In the previous post I wrote, I explained how to setup replication from an on-premise SQL Server instance to an Azure SQL database. While doing this, I came across a very strange issue (or maybe even bug) when setting up replication.

 
The problem child
After working on reproducing the issue for a day, and trying to reduce the issue to a small-scale problem, I came to the conclusion that the problem was (probably) caused by a single primary key on a table in the database:


CREATE TABLE dbo.BuggedTable
	([Day] DATE NOT NULL,
	 SomeId VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
	 Amount INT NOT NULL,
	 CONSTRAINT PK_BuggedTable PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
		([Day] ASC,
		SomeId ASC
		)
	)
GO

 
Creating publication & subscriber
The setup of the publication and subscriber wasn’t that difficult. As I said before, there are a few things you need to configure differently then you would do for SQL Server to SQL Server replication.

So I won’t talk you through the whole process again, but refer you to the articles instead. Continue reading Replication: Snapshot Agent fails on date conversion

Setting up replication from on-premise SQL Server to Azure SQL DB

For performance reasons we are looking for a way to split our write-operations from our read operations. A good way to do that is by duplicating the database onto another server (on-premise) or platform (Azure SQL DB). When you look at the options (Availability Groups (AG), database mirroring, clustering, replication, Azure sync groups, etc.) the easiest way to quickly duplicate a database and keep the data up-to-date at the same time is SQL Server replication.

Replication to another on-premise instance is easy. You just follow the steps in the wizard, it works out-of-the-box, and the chances of this process failing are small. With replicating data to an Azure SQL database it’s a bit more of a struggle. Just one single word took me a few HOURS of investigation and a lot of swearing… Continue reading Setting up replication from on-premise SQL Server to Azure SQL DB